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Podiatric Services

We provide a broad spectrum of care ranging from general podiatric care to surgical intervention

The feet serve as the foundation of the body. When pain is experienced, it’s therefore extremely important to identify early on what and where the issue is. The causes of foot pain vary greatly, including but not limited to diseases, deformities, improper footwear, and injuries pertaining to the foot region.

 

Those who experience foot pain may also notice redness, swelling, soreness, bruising, or numbness present at the injured area. When these symptoms occur, it’s important to also identify where the pain experienced is located, as there are a number of foot complications that could be at the root of the problem. For example, different foot conditions can affect different areas such as the heel, ball of the foot, foot arch, the toes, or ankles, to name a few.

 

Common heel pain conditions include heel spurs and heel fractures. Morton’s neuroma is a condition that often comes with pain experienced at the ball of the foot, as well as sesamoiditis. Those suffering from discomfort in their arches may have flat feet or plantar fasciitis. Common issues that affect the toes include gout, bunions, blisters, corns and calluses, as well as hammertoe and ingrown toenail. An ankle sprains is also a common ailment that can lead to foot pain.

 

Treatment for foot pain varies for each case, depending on both the cause of pain and the location of the affected area. The most common recommendations for easing the discomfort of foot pain include the following: getting plenty of rest, icing and heating the area in which pain is felt, pain relievers, and keeping the foot elevated to avoid swelling.

 

If you’re experiencing foot pain, schedule a consult with one of our podiatrists as soon as possible for a proper diagnosis and suggested treatment plan.

Heel pain, while quite common, can be extremely uncomfortable and painful if not met with proper care or treatment. Heel pain may occur if you injure or overuse the heel. If left uncared for, the affected area may worsen, limiting your mobility and making it difficult to perform everyday activities, such as walking.

 

There are many different causes of heel pain, including strains or sprains, tarsal tunnel syndrome, stress fractures, Achilles tendonitis, and heel bursitis. One of the most common causes of heel pain for children and teenagers specifically is Sever’s disease. Sever’s disease can develop due to overuse or repetitive microtrauma of the heel bone’s growth plates. This condition is often seen among those who are active in sporting activities.

 

Other causes of heel pain may include issues with poor circulation, poor posture when walking or running, a soft tissue mass, and a rupture of the Achilles tendon. To help ease the discomfort of heel pain, it’s advised that you get plenty of rest, apply ice to the affected area, and wear shoes that fit properly. In some more serious cases, a podiatrist might recommend the use of custom orthotics or shoe inserts for extra support.

 

If you’re experiencing heel pain, schedule a consult with one of our podiatrists as soon as possible for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan.

When it comes to receiving foot and ankle surgery, it’s typically a case by case situation. Some factors that play a role in whether or not you need surgery include the severity of your symptoms as well as your response to other conservative, noninvasive treatment methods.

There are a number of different foot and ankle conditions that may benefit from surgery as a treatment option. Bunions, hammertoe, metatarsal, ankle arthritis, Achilles tendon disorders, Morton’s neuroma, tibialis posterior disorder, and plantar fasciitis are all conditions that may require surgery as a treatment option, depending on their severity. Long-lasting pain relief is typically the biggest takeaway from having surgery performed to remedy your condition.

 

In order to best prepare for surgery, make sure you have a consultation with your podiatrist about your overall health, discuss any possible changes in medication, and ask any questions you may have about the procedure to go into the treatment with a clear head. In some cases, you may have to refrain from eating and drinking a few hours before the procedure, so make sure you understand what must be done on your end beforehand.

 

As for recovery, again, this will typically vary case by case and will be dependent on your condition and the type of surgery performed. Generally, it’s recommended that you get plenty of rest, ice the affected area, compress the wound to aid in further strain, and keep the area elevated to reduce any possible swelling. In some cases, your podiatrist may encourage you to use bandages, splints, surgical shoes, casts, crutches, orthotics, or a cane, depending on how much weight they believe your foot and ankle can bear.

 

If you’d like to determine whether surgery is the best option for you and your foot condition, consult with one of our podiatrists  who will be able to give you a proper diagnosis and aid you with your decision.

Ingrown toenails can form when the side of a toenail begins to grow into the flesh surrounding the nail. As a result, the affected toe—most commonly the big toe—may become red, swollen, painful, and—in severe cases—infected.

 

There are many reasons why an ingrown toenail may develop. Improperly cutting your toenails is a major cause of ingrown toenails. If toenails aren’t cut straight across or are cut too short, the likelihood of getting an ingrown toenail may increase. Other causes include having unusually curved toenails, wearing shoes that don’t give your toes an ample amount of space, and hereditary factors. Injuring the toe by stubbing it or having an object fall on it may also lead to ingrown toenails. If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to further complications with the foot.

 

If you are someone who has diabetes, it’s extremely important to remain mindful of ingrown toenail prevention, as minor cuts or simple scrapes can lead to serious complications. You can prevent ingrown toenails by ensuring toenails are straight across and at a moderate length, wearing shoes that fit properly, and checking feet daily for signs of foot issues.

 

Treatment for an ingrown toenail will vary on a case by case basis. One form of treatment requires lifting the ingrown nail and placing a splint or piece of cotton underneath. Another method for a more severe case would involve partially removing the nail. For cases that need extreme care, the nail itself and tissue would have to be removed.

 

If you’d like more information about ingrown toenails, schedule a consult with one of our podiatrists who can give you a proper diagnosis and go over your treatment options.

A bunion is a bony, painful swelling that is often formed on the first joint of the big toe. Bunions can be extremely painful due to the weight of all your body resting on it each time you take a step. Everyday activities, such as walking and wearing shoes, can cause you extreme discomfort if you have a bunion.

 

Reasons that a person may develop a bunion can vary. Some patients may form bunions due to genetic factors, complications with arthritis, or a weak foot structure. General aging can also play a role in the formation of a bunion.

 

If you have a bunion, you may notice a bony bump on your big toe, experience swelling and redness, and the area may feel tender to the touch. To help alleviate the pain that often comes with having a bunion, it’s suggested to maintain a healthy weight to help lessen the pressure on your toe, practice both heating and icing the affected area, wear wide-fitting shoes wear to leave plenty of space for your toes and to minimize rubbing, and look into shoe inserts that can help position your foot correctly.

 

Because bunions can result in other painful foot problems, such as hammertoes and bursitis, we recommend that you meet with one of our podiatrists for a professional diagnosis and for information regarding all your treatment options.

Unfortunately, foot problems are often a common result of having diabetes. As time goes by, it’s likely that diabetes can cause nerve damage, also known as diabetic neuropathy. This can lead to tingling or a painful sensation, and it may also cause you to lose feeling in your feet. The loss of feeling in your feet can become incredibly dangerous, especially if you can longer sense a blister or cut on your foot; this can lead to sores or infections.

 

There are many ways to maintain healthy foot care when dealing with diabetes. Most importantly, you want to ensure that you’re managing your blood glucose levels, otherwise known as your blood sugar. You also want to ensure that you’re checking your feet daily. As mentioned before, it’s important to recognize if your feet have cuts, sores, blisters, plantar warts, ingrown toenails, or other troubling foot conditions to stay ahead of the issue and prevent yourself from further harm. Along with foot checks, you should also wash and dry your feet daily using lukewarm water. It may also be useful in certain cases to moisturize your feet a few times a week, especially if you’re prone to dryness. Please be advised, however, to avoid moisturizing between the toes as they will not dry properly. Another rule you may want to follow is to ensure you’re cutting your toenails straight across. You should also refrain from digging into the sides of the toes; this will help prevent the development of an ingrown toenail. If you do happen to develop a corn or callus, never treat them yourself; seek the help of a professional. It may also be beneficial to look into socks made specifically for those with diabetes to help provide yourself with extra cushion. You may also want to refrain from walking barefoot, as well as avoid smoking, as it restricts the blood flow to your feet.

 

In certain serious cases, you may notice a cut, blister, or bruise is not healing after a few days. If this occurs, it’s important to seek the help of a professional. Other warning signs include redness, swelling, a callus with dried blood inside of it, or an infection that causes discoloration of the foot and an odor.

 

If you’d like more information on how to maintain healthy feet while living with diabetes, schedule an appointment with one of our podiatrists who can provide you with the tips needed for healthy foot care.

Plantar fasciitis affects the plantar regions of the foot, namely the heel, arch, and midfoot. When too much stress is put on the plantar fascia, or the connective tissue that stretches from the heel to the ball of your foot, inflammation, overtightening, and tearing may arise. This can cause foot pain. Because of plantar fasciitis, you may experience tearing with the first steps you take in the morning each day.

 

A certain trigger that may cause stress to the plantar fascia includes poor arch support, which is brought upon by frequently walking barefoot or wearing shoes with improper arch support. Other causes include obesity or a sudden increase in weight, increased physical activity, weak foot and ankle muscles, tight calf muscles, and arthritis.

 

If you’re feeling pain after sitting, walking, or standing for a long period of time, as well as when you first step out of bed or climb stairs, you may be showing signs of plantar fasciitis. To know for sure what’s causing you pain, it’s best that you get an x-ray taken of your foot.

Because plantar fasciitis is known to worsen over time, we highly recommended that you meet with one of our podiatrists as soon as possible for a proper diagnosis and advised treatment plan.

Hammertoes can be identified by an abnormal bend in the middle joint of the toe. This abnormal bending can lead to added pressure on the toe when wearing shoes. It can also cause pain or discomfort when walking or running. Because hammertoes typically worsen overtime and become increasingly more rigid, it’s recommended that you seek the help of a podiatrist for treatment options if you believe you’re experiencing the symptoms of this deformity.

 

Those experiencing hammertoe may also find other foot related issues that come with this condition, such as corns or calluses. Some factors that may influence your likelihood of getting hammertoe include old age, toe length, improper footwear, and genetics. Those who have diabetes or arthritis are also more likely to have foot related complications, including hammertoe.

 

To help better prevent yourself from getting hammertoe, it’s recommended that you avoid wearing shoes that limit the room for your toes. Footwear with low heels, as well as adjustable straps or laces, can be useful when it comes to providing your feet with ample room to move. Buying shoes that fit are also important, which is why we recommend shopping at the end of the day when your feet are at their largest. This helps you avoid choosing a shoe too small for your feet.

 

Orthotics, as well as medical pads for corns and calluses that may develop due to your hammertoe, are recommended to help relieve discomfort. Light toe exercises may also be helpful for strengthening the muscles and mobility of your toes.

For a proper diagnosis and recommended treatment plan, schedule a consult with one of our podiatrist for professional help and care.

The Achilles tendon is not only the strongest, but also the largest tendon in the human body. The main function of the Achilles tendon is to transmit power from the calf muscles to the heel and the foot.

 

It’s because of the Achilles tendon that we are able to stand on our toes when walking, running, or jumping. Even with all of its strength, the Achilles tendon can be exposed to injury. Due to its limited blood supply and the high tensions placed on it, the Achilles heel can be left vulnerable if harmed.

 

Possible conditions that may arise due to injury of the Achilles tendon include tears, ruptures, tendinitis, peritendinitis, tendinosis, tendinopathy, and bursitis. When trying to diagnose if one has issues with their Achilles tendon, a podiatrist will commonly check for any pain, swelling, or discoloration around the heel or lower leg area. Different treatments for issues concerning the Achilles tendon vary, but may include over-the-counter or prescribed pain relievers for intense discomfort, alternating ice and heat therapy, custom-made orthotics, physical therapy, and in severe cases, surgery. To help prevent injury to the Achilles tendon, it’s recommended to regularly perform stretches involving the muscles of the lower leg.

 

If you or someone you know is experiencing pain or discomfort involving the Achilles region, schedule an appointment with one of our podiatrists for a proper diagnosis and treatment regime.